Dekoven School of Arms Class Roster



Agrippa’s Ball, or Rolling with the Rapier: On using the whole body and its aspects in guard
Instructor: John O’Meara
Italian rapier is a linear art, but the rotational aspect of the system is often overlooked. We will look at integrating sword, body and left hand to create a fluid, “rolling” offense and defense in the style of Salvatore Fabris. (Bring your favorite companion weapon — dagger, cloak, or buckler.)

Bolognese Sprezzatura: Must-Know Fundamentals of Bolognese Sword and Buckler
Instructor: Tom Leoni
Do you really think you know the fundamentals of Bolognese sword and buckler? And even if you do, does your body? For the more experienced swordsman ambitious to firm up his basics, as well as the beginner wanting to start on the right path, this class is an intensive on what you must know to successfully tackle the actions of Manciolino and Marozzo. From precise formation of the guards to efficient, martial-looking steps; from powerful cutting and thrusting mechanics to building intent in your actions; from positive, sure parries in all lines to accurate ripostes; from entering a crossing to safely performing a take-off; from provoking tempi from the opponent to exploiting them successfully–these are the basics you will drill in this class.

In addition, you will learn how to use your off-hand weapon (the buckler) as taught by the great Bolognese masters.

The main goal of this class is to let you develop a sense of mechanical precision, outward elegance (looking like the book), and effortless sprezzatura in the style of the men who invented the word.

Gioco Largo (Wide Play) to Gioco Stretto (Narrow Play) in Bolognese Swordsmanship–with Single-hander, Longsword or Spadone
Instructor: Tom Leoni

In this class, you will have a chance to bring your favorite weapon and truly understand the concepts of gioco largo and gioco stretto. Bring your single-handed sword with or without buckler, and  your medieval longsword or spadone — you will be using them both!

We will use the universal rules taught by Manciolino and Marozzo to:

  • Understand, hands-on, the nature of either play, as well as their differences
  • Learn multiple ways to safely arrive at and enter the narrow play
  • Visualize the main decision-tree of narrow-play actions
  • Develop a feel for the type of crossing with the opponent, and to choose your action accordingly
  • Learn the fundamental actions of wrestling at the sword

As the masters say, failing to understand the narrow play may put you in the position of being chased around by the opponent, while you flee across the salle fearing what lies beyond the safe confines of wide play.


Keeping the Sword Free (Rapier)
Instuctor: John O’Meara
It’s not enough to find and control the opponent’s sword, we also have to keep control of our own. And what if he finds us first? Here’s how to keep the advantage in the Italian rapier fight, regain it once it’s lost, and avoid the “contendere di spada” (aka the “death bind”).                                                                                                                                                                  

Rotella and Sword: With Great Cover Comes Great Responsibility (Bolognese)
Instructor: Devon Boorman
Students in this workshop will explore the tactical environment of the larger rotella and how to maximize the benefit of its cover while accommodating for the greater constraint it puts on the maneuverability of your sword.

Partisan without Tears (Bolognese)
Instructor: Greg Mele
It was only late in the 17th century that fencing began to separate into the ars militarie and those of self-defense; the well-rounded swordsman of the 16th century was expected to have proficient with all manner of arms. This included the sword used with a variety of companion weapons, but also the two-handed sword, polearms and at least the basics of close combat.

In this short class we will look at one of the most common, useful, and for modern students – fun – polearms of the Bolognese tradition – the partisan. A massive, winged slashing spear, the partisan, whether used alone or with the rotella, was a both a common weapon of the battlefield and routinely appeared in the lists for use in a judicial duel.

In this short class we will look at the fundamental guards and defenses of the weapon, how it combines cuts and thrusts in a way similar to the sword alone, and learn several plays taken directly from the works of Antonio Manciolino and Achille Marozzo.

Please bring either a partisan or a 7 – 8′ spear, with the last 18″ (Including the point), marked to represent the cutting edge. We will have some additional weapons on hand for those traveling by plane.

Stringere: Are You Truly Constraining Your Opponent, Or Do You Just Think You Are? (Rapier)
Instructor: Devon Boorman
Many Italian practitioners are making mechanically and tactically weak choices in their positions but are not having those positions challenged in a manner that leads to the development of truly effective technique.  In this class we will explore the mechanical and tactical side of stringere, how to make positions that are truly sound and how to view and exploit positions that are weak.





Something Old, Something New, Destreza Common, and Destreza True (Destreza and Esgrima Comun)
Instructor: Tim Rivera and Puck Curtis

For years, Carranza has been called the father of Spanish fencing.  Recently, estranged uncle Godinho has returned to shed some light on the tales that brother Pacheco has been telling about his vulgar cousins and grandparents, and it turns out they’re a much closer family than previously thought.  The similarities and differences between the “true” destreza and the “common” destreza will be explored in order to understand the state of Spanish fencing from which Carranza created his method, as well as its possible origins.  Recognizing the relationship between these styles will lead to a broader understanding of what Spanish fencing really is.

The Spanish Sword and its Companion Arms: Shield, Buckler, and Dagger (Esgrima Comun)
Instructor: Tim Rivera
In 1599, maestro Domingo Luis Godinho wrote that although the three double arms (sword and rodela, buckler, or dagger) are distinct, their play is not.  This class will be in two parts; the first will build the necessary foundation of sword alone in the common Spanish style, and the second will integrate your companion weapon of choice: rodela, buckler, or dagger.  Bring your favorite and learn how to fight in the common Spanish style, or bring them all and learn how the use of one translates to the use of the others.


Tactical Showdown: Italian vs. Spanish
Instructor: Devon Boorman vs. Puck Curtis
Starting from the initial approach, to crossing safely into measure, tactically controlling the opponent, finding the right moment to strike, and concluding with a safe exit. Students will explore the fundamental flow chart of the Italian and Spanish tactical approach to the rapier at each stage and readily conclude that the Italian masters had a far better handle on what they were doing.


Atajos: Making them, Breaking them, and the Naughty Attacks That Love Them (Destreza)
Instructor: Puck Curtis
In this class students will enjoy a crash course in the Atajo within a variety of contexts from simple to extreme.  In addition, we will examine ways to escape and reverse the atajo in order to open up a new tree of fencing actions taken from an initial position of disadvantage.  All of these actions will be coupled with a friendly dose of violence certain to delight your friends.

No experience required.  Bring mask, single-handed training sword, gloves, and a padded jacket.

Figueiredo’s Destreza sword and dagger (Destreza)
Instructor: Puck Curtis
From Portugal comes a Carranza-based form of Destreza which challenges Pacheco’s authority while also integrating beautifully with his work.  In these pages we see a simple and effective sword and dagger system to complement the existing single-sword material.  What happens when you pull out a dagger for your left hand in the streets of Madrid at midnight?  Find out here.

Montante vs. the World
Instructor: Tim Rivera
According to maestro Luis de Viedma, the montante is a weapon of little courtesy, and with it a man is forced to defend his life without having respect for anyone.  Forget fighting in narrow streets.  Forget breaking up fights.  Forget guarding a lady or your damn cloak.  This weapon is for driving your adversaries before you.  Outnumbered?  Surrounded?  Facing shields and polearms?  You’ve got a montante; time to show them what it was built for.

Trading Places: Parry-Ripostes and Counteroffense in Destreza
Instructor: Puck Curtis
The true mark of an experienced martial artist is excellent timing and La Verdadera Destreza’s method of stealing the place from your adversary is the diestro’s playground.  In this class we will use the adversary’s movements and footwork against him to develop our assaults at his expense.  This class will be particularly useful if you often fight with a reach disadvantage.

Some beginner level experience recommended.  Bring mask, single-handed training sword, gloves, and a padded jacket.

Spanish Use of Two Swords, in Rules
Instructor: Tim Rivera
The Belgian nobleman Jehan L’Hermite, during his time in Spain, learned the use of two swords from the maestro mayor Pablo de Paredes in 1599, recalling that it consisted of very beautiful turns in good order and step, with which one defends himself and offends the enemy, learned in rules.  The same year, maestro Domingo Luis Godinho wrote a manuscript containing rules for two swords which match that description.  Students will learn some of these rules and their applications against being surrounded, guarding a cloak, and others.